Food and Fertilizer Technology Center - publications

Jul. 17, 2020

2019 PROJECT 7: Enabling capacity in production and application of biopesticides and biofertilizers for soil borne disease control and organic farming

2019 PROJECT 7: Enabling capacity in production and application of biopesticides and biofertilizers for soil borne disease control and organic farming

The joint FFTC-VAAS workshop on “Enabling Capacity in Production and Application of Biopesticides and Biofertilizers for Soil-borne Disease Control and Organic Farming” held in Hanoi gathered 23 speakers from nine countries. The workshop reviewed the current status of soil-borne diseases problems in the region and explored innovative technologies like the use of biopesticides and biofertilizers to adopt for soil disease control.

Venue: Hanoi, Vietnam
Date: May 6-10
Participating countries: 9 countries (France, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam)
Participants: 70 participants including 15 speakers
Papers presented: 18
Co-organizers: Vietnam Academy of Agricultural Sciences (VAAS)

Biopesticides and biofertilizers are now in demand because of their eco-friendly characteristics. They are cost effective and have been found to supplement or replace some agrochemicals which have harmful effects on human health and the environment. Now that organic farming is becoming a worldwide trend, farmers and even ordinary consumers are getting curious to learn the science and technology on how to properly use them.

FFTC, together with the Vietnam Academy of Agricultural Sciences (VAAS), gathered 20 speakers from nine countries (France, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam) and representatives of five private companies to hold a workshop on “Enabling Capacity in Production and Application of Biopesticides and Biofertilizers for Soil-borne Disease Control and Organic Farming.” The workshop, which was held in Hanoi, aims to review the current status of soil-borne diseases problems in the region and explore innovative technologies like the use of biopesticides and biofertilizers to adopt for soil-disease control.

Presentations delivered by invited soil scientists and plant pathologists all claim that 50 years of intensive and chemical farming have taken its toll on both soil and water quality, leading to an increase in plant diseases and other pest problems. According to experts, soil-borne pathogens, including fungi, fungi-like microorganisms, bacteria as well as viruses and plant parasitic nematodes are one of the major factors that contribute to low yields of agricultural products. Since agrochemicals are usually expensive and sometimes detrimental to both human health and the environment, biological control has now become a very important component of plant disease management. One such approach is to apply organic amendments to soils to suppress soil-borne diseases. This is where the use of bio-agents such as biopesticides and biofertilizers comes in. They are now called an integral part of organic farming, especially in vegetable cultivation, in which their use is considered alternate strategy to the prevalent use of chemical pesticides.

However, the use of biopesticides and biofertilizers is not as easy as it sounds. Participants in the workshop claim that there are lots of fake bio products in the market and in some countries, the application for permission to use biopesticides is quite difficult, combining methods of control has become a trend. Integrated Pest Management uses various methods like crop rotation, soil solarization, soil amendments, grafting and biological control and use of natural compounds are often recommended by soil scientists. There are also many varieties of microorganisms, including fungi and bacteria, which have been developed and registered as biological pesticides that could be alternative choices for chemical pesticides.

Major findings and recommendations

1. Conduct more studies and research in IPM to ensure long-lasting sustainability in crop production.

2. Employ IPM measures that have been proven to reduce the number of pesticide used, and are more efficient, healthy and environmentally friendly.

3. Diagnose and assess the disease occurrence potential of crops before planting them in the field and implement the appropriate control measures based on the potential degree using a decision-making system.

4. Study and make the necessary adoption of critical knowledge in crop disease management for sustainable agriculture, the aim of which is to disrupt the disease components at every stage of crop growth.

5. Train technical leaders or extension workers who can explain to the farmers the science of using biofertilizers and biopesticides and their corresponding benefits.

6. Do further studies and research on the mechanism of inoculating beneficial microbes at different concentrations and their effects.

7. Inculcate the perspective of viewing soil fertility as a complex system with their intrinsic biological, physical, and chemical properties.

8. Teach farmers to provide nutrition not only for their plants but also to the biological agents. Giving the proper nutrients to both plants and bio-agents can help enhance stability, growth and survival.

List of papers

• Review on soil-borne pathogen/diseases research in Taiwan and other countries - Chaur Tsuen Lo -
• Emerging trends in biocontrol of soil pests and diseases concept and capacity building - Malvika Chaudhary -
• Soil microbiology and its interaction with plant health in agro ecological systems - Jean Luc Maeght -
• The soil-borne pathogen/diseases problems and management strategies for industrial crop (coffee, pepper): Experience from Vietnam - Nguyen Van Tuat -
• The soil-borne pathogen/diseases problems and management strategies for fruit trees production: Experience from Vietnam - Dang Thi Kim Uyen -
• Development of a novel soil-borne disease management strategy, health checkup based soil-borne disease management (HeSoDiM) - Shigenobu Yoshida -
• The soil-borne pathogen/diseases problems and management strategies: experience from Malaysia - Ganishan Krishnen -
• The soil-borne pathogen/diseases problems and management strategies: experience from Indonesia - Surono Bin Tjasmad -
• Potential of biological products on the organic approach to control the dominant soil-borne plant pathogens: Experience from Thailand - Chainarong Rattanakreetakul -
• Biocontrol of Fusarium wilt of solanaceous crops: the Philippine experience - Eufrocinio Marfori -
• The promising sources of microorganism and organic materials for biopesticide production in Vietnam - Pham Van Toan -
• The promising sources of microorganism for biopesticide production: Am Overview - Trinh Xuan Hoat -
• Importance of the microbial quality of commercial biofertilizers and how CMBP network can contribute to improve them in SEA - Didier Leseur -
• Application of biocontrol agent and other practices for controlling strawberry anthracnose in Taiwan - Tsung Chung Lin -
• Bacillus valezensis strain GH1-13 reveals agriculturally beneficial properties by enhancing plant growth and suppressing fungal pathogens - Sang Yoon Kim -
• Construction of organic soil based on soil fertility index (SOFIX) - Motoki Kubo -
• Application of bio-products to control plant parasite nematodes and soil borne diseases on black pepper and coffee in Vietnam - Nguyen Thi Chuc Quynh -
• Efficacy of bio-pesiticides developed by Jianon Enterprise Co., Ltd. for controlling of soil-borne diseases caused by Ralstonia solanacearum and Fusarium spp. in Taiwan - I-Chang Yang -

SOFRI’s Dr. Dang Thi Kim Uyen, in her presentation entitled “Soil-borne Pathogen/Disease Problems and Management Strategy for Fruit Trees Production: Experience from Vietnam,” says that since 2005, their institute has done many kinds of research and development on soil-borne diseases.

In the workshop, FFTC signs an MOU with VAAS. The said MOU aims to strengthen the cooperation between the two organizations. Dr. Nguyen Hong Song, President of VAAS, and FFTC Director Dr. Kuo-Ching Lin, sign the MOU after which the two parties exchange gifts to further seal their partnership.

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